foreclosure


Short Sale vs. Foreclosure

People often ask me if a short sale is really worth the effort.  Well, I’d be the first to admit that short sales can be a real pain for everyone involved…sellers, Realtors, buyers…and because so many fail, people often have a negative view of the short sale process.  But, do you really know the benefits over foreclosure that might make it worth the effort?  Watch this short video and see why short sale if becoming an attractive alternative to foreclosure for many homeowners.

 

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With short sales accounting for over 17% of all sales in July, and thousands of homeowners upside down on their mortgages, the California Association of Realtors believes that short sales will be a part of the real estate market place for years to come.  Economic growth just isn’t happening quickly enough to keep pace with the number of homeowners who are sinking closer to foreclosure with each passing month.  For many, opting to sell their home in a short sale is the best option because of the less damaging impact on their credit.  But agreeing to list a short sale can be the start of an uphill battle for the Realtors involved. 

One of the biggest issues facing short sale transactions is the time involved for even a preliminary review of the offer and submitted documentation.  This step alone can often take one to three months before the lender even assigns a negotiator to the file.  Another annoying reality is lost or misplaced documentation.  With many lenders one feels that there must be a trash can on the other end of the fax machine as requests for the same documentation are made over and over.  All of this takes time…and the buyer is often out there still looking for something they can buy more quickly, with less hassle.

The California Association of Realtors has recently sent urgent requests to the heads of all the major lenders, JP Morgan Chase, Bank of America, Citigroup and Wells Fargo with recommendations about how the whole process can be streamlined.  A few of the items requested include:

  • Realistic timelines
  • A thorough explanation for short sales that are denied
  • Up front disclosure about who really owns the loan and can make a decision
  • Pre-approval of the short sale and price prior to marketing the property
  • Increased pay-off to the junior lien holder

As a dues paying member of  C.A.R. and a Realtor in the short sale trenches I’d be thrilled to see even one or two of these recommendations become part of lender procedure.  In the meantime, I’ll just be the one on the phone politely nudging them along, every step of the way.

 

 

If I’ve sounded a bit like a broken record over the last 10 months, it’s because I strongly believe that principal reductions are an import key to ending the housing crisis.  People who are struggling to make payments on an upside down mortgage are more likely to avoid default if they are paying on a mortgage based on 2011 home values.  Fewer defaults mean more stable values and ultimately an end to the real estate crash.  And apparently some of the banks now agree.

According to the Wall Street Journal, Bank of America is finally bringing principal reduction modifications to the bargaining table.  For months now, B of A and the nation’s other four largest servicers have been in discussion with state and federal officials in an attempt to settle charges of inappropriate activities in connection with foreclosure proceedings.  Investigations last September revealed that several servicers used illegal affidavits and faulty paperwork in their foreclosure practices, and the banks are now hoping to settle and avoid any further liability.

The state attorneys general have pushed for principal reduction as part of the settlement, but until recently the banks have refused.  The private negotiations have been going on for months, and the June 15th target for resolution has come and gone.  As a means of kicking the discussion into high gear, B of A has now offered principal reductions as a bargaining chip, and the other banks are expected to follow.

Of course, Bank of America is not offering principal reductions because they actually care about keeping people in their homes, but rather because they hope to make the problems caused by sloppy and illegal foreclosure practices go away.  But in any case, the end result could be the answer to the prayers of many homeowners facing default.

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A recent study by analytics company CoreLogic reported that nearly 25% of all mortgage borrowers owe more than their home is worth.  The aggregate amount of negative equity in the U.S. was a whopping $750 billion at the end of last year.   This lost equity prevents homeowners from refinancing or moving, and according to the report, is the “dominant factor” driving the real estate market.

If you’re among the millions who are paying each month for negative equity, you probably have some questions about your options.  To help address this issue, I’m offering a FREE workshop here in San Diego covering the following:

  • Should I wait for home values to increase?  What is the future of San Diego real estate?
  • What about a loan modification?  What programs are available, how do I qualify, and how many loan modifications are actually approved?
  • If I can’t afford my payments, what are my options?
  • What is involved in the foreclosure process?  How long can I stay in my home? How will it affect my credit?
  • Will filing Bankruptcy save my home?
  • What is a strategic default?  What are the risks?
  • What is a Deed in Lieu of Foreclosure?
  • Is a short sale better than foreclosure?  What is the process? What is a HAFA short sale?
  • What about deficiency judgments and 1099s?  When can I qualify to buy again?

Saturday, June 25th  10:00 – 11:30 a.m. 

San Diego County Library, 4S Ranch

10433 Reserve Dr, San Diego, CA 92127

There is no fee or obligation for attendance, but space is limited.  Advance registration is required.  Homeowners will receive comprehensive workshop materials.

Call 1-888-464-1820 x104 to Register Today

As mentioned previously, I’m not an accountant or lawyer and you should always consult the appropriate professional before making any major decision about your home.

 

Everyday I wake up, turn on my computer and read all the real estate news.  But pretty soon I’m scratching my head, wondering whether or not anyone really has a clue about what’s going on.  One story says values have double-dipped at a new low, another says they’re on the rise.  Some “experts” insist that reducing unemployment will drive the real estate recovery, while others have the statistics to “prove” that a stronger real estate market will be what heals the national economy.  No wonder the real estate market is stagnant – everyone is paralyzed by uncertainty!

As noted previously, I have no crystal ball.  Nor do I have a doctorate in economics.  However, I do know one thing that will help heal both the real estate market and the overall economy:   Would-be buyers and defaulting owners – take action now!  

If you are thinking about buying a property, quit thinking and start doing!  This is a fabulous buyer’s market and both prices and interest rates are at incredible lows.  If you’re worried that you won’t get the absolute lowest price because values might continue to drop, you’re probably wrong.  Most experts believe that we’ll see some slight ups and downs in value over the next 2 years, but it will be more of a bumpy road versus a roller coaster dive.   If you wait another year to buy, you’ll lose 12 months of mortgage interest deduction, and the enjoyment of owning your own home or investment property.

On the other hand, if you’re unable to continue to make your mortgage payments it’s definitely time to take action.  You probably won’t win the lottery, so call your bank and try to get a loan modification.  If that doesn’t work, consider a short sale.  Avoiding a foreclosure through short sale is generally not only better for the seller, but it will help the real estate market and economy.  Banks are choking on foreclosure inventory, and as those homes are released into the sales system they are often neglected and tend to lower home values.  Reducing the number of new foreclosures is key to recovery for everyone.

So if you’re still unsure and have questions about buying or selling, just give me a call.  I’m ready when you are to help turn this market around!

On May 24th, The New York Times ran an article in their Opinion section that revealed a nasty, little-known truth about loan servicing that I find outrageous.

As most homeowners know, your mortgage is probably not owned or serviced by the bank or company from whom you originally borrowed.  Not only was your loan probably sold in the secondary market, but it is likely that it is serviced by an entirely different company than the bank or company you actually owe. 

Loan servicing refers to the tasks associated with collecting your monthly payment, paying the investor, and often times, managing payments for insurance and property taxes.  These servicers are also responsible for sending out notices associated with delinquencies, collection activities, and if needed managing defaults.  In return, the servicer is paid a percentage of the principal amount owed, usually 12.5 – 50 basis points (1bp = 0.01%).  Additionally, the flat servicing fee may be augmented with a variety of incentives, all designed to create additional cash flow from each loan on the books.  The total value of these fees and incentives are noted on the servicer’s balance sheet as MSRs – Mortgage Servicing Rights.

Now here is the kicker:  Banks make more from the fees and charges associated with managing a defaulted loan and foreclosure than they can make on a loan modification!  Surprised?  No wonder so few modifications are approved; the servicers have their MSRs to protect! 

The only winners in this game are the servicers.  Not only do the homeowners seeking a modification lose, but so do the banks and investors who will foot the high cost of foreclosures and carrying REOs. 

Luckily, there are others that find this behavior unacceptable.  Democrats Jack Reed and Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island and Sherrod Brown of Ohio have introduced Senate bills to establish standards for the loan servicing industry.  The proposed laws and regulations are designed to prevent banks from putting their financial interests above those of everyone else.

Here are 3 suggested new rules: 

1)      Homeowners would be evaluated for loan modification before ANY foreclosure activity, or related fee is initiated.

2)      Lender analysis used to approve or reject loan modifications would be standardized and public.

3)      Should a lender fail to offer a modification when analysis indicates that one is warranted the lender would be blocked from proceeding with foreclosure.

Whether it is the result of a Senate Bill, or actions by the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, someone needs to rein-in the greed of the loan servicing industry and give borrowers a much-needed break.

The short answer is “No” and “Maybe”.  When faced with the prospect of losing their home to foreclosure, many people are willing to try most anything to halt the process and save their home.  Bankruptcy however, is probably not the answer.

Let me first say that I’m not an attorney, and do not intend this as legal advice.  If you are considering bankruptcy, please consult an attorney before taking any action.

Personal bankruptcy is generally filed under Chapter 7 or Chapter 13.  Under Chapter 7 most of your unsecured debt (such as credit card debt) is permanently discharged, while Chapter 13 allows you to reorganize your debt with your creditors and develop a plan to pay-off your debts over a specific period of time.  If you qualify and file personal bankruptcy under either Chapter 7 or 13, an automatic stay is put on all your creditors, including a lender that might be pursuing foreclosure.   However, this is only a temporary halt to the foreclosure process.

As mentioned above, filing Chapter 7 does not discharge your secured debts.  A mortgage is a secured debt and the collateral is your home.  If you do not pay, your lender has the right to take back the security you offered in exchange for the money advanced as a mortgage.  So filing a Chapter 7 will not save your home from foreclosure.  At any time before your unsecured debts are discharged, the court can allow your lender’s request for “relief from the automatic stay” and the foreclosure can proceed.  After discharge, the foreclosing lender is free to continue the process.

Filing Chapter 13 however may allow you to save your home from foreclosure.  In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy you are allowed to make arrangements with your creditors for repayment of debts owed, including your mortgage.  However, this is generally allowed by the courts only when you have a stable source of income that will allow you to make all payments as agreed for the entire repayment period.  There are many factors that determine if filing for protection under Chapter 13 will allow you to keep your home. The only way you will know if this will work in your particular situation is to consult an attorney.

It is also important to note that a bankruptcy will remain on your credit report for 10 years after date of filing. If this doesn’t seem like a viable solution, please read more about other options to avoid foreclosure.

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