Buying a Foreclosure


San Diego real estate broker Marti Kilby describes the precuations you should take when buying a foreclosed property.


 

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La Mesa, CA Real Estate Market Update – November 2011

 

                                                 

 

 

 

La Mesa,CA is a great place to call home!  From the quaint downtown filled with restaurants and antique shops, to the views from Mt.Helix, there are many wonderful neighborhoods with their own distinctive vibe.  But like most everywhere throughout the county, real estate values continue to slip, as noted in this real estate market update.

La Mesa, CA Single Family Home Sales – November 2011

Total number of sales                       51

            Short sales                                 9

            REO sales                                   8

Average price                                     $381,197

Average days on market                 71

Average price 2010                          $417,252

Average price YTD 2011                 $387,727

Prices for single family homes have not showed a significant decline throughout the year, which may be a sign that the market is starting to level out.

La Mesa, CA Attached Home Sales – November 2011

Total number of sales                    14

            Short sales                             3

            REO sales                                2

Average price                                  $190,807

Average days on market              51

Average price 2010                        $190,580

Average price YTD 2011               $167,587

The average price for November for attached homes is surprisingly high when compared to the preceding months.  As we enter 2012 we will have to see if this is a trend, or merely a month with more sales of higher priced units.

To learn more about the La Mesa, CA real estate market, just give me a call!  I’ve lived in the area for over 20 years and would love to show you why this is such a great place to call home.

Freddie Mac announced yesterday that for the first time in history, the average interest rate for a 30-year fixed rate mortgage has dropped below 4.00%  to 3.94%.  Rates for 15-year fixed rate mortgages are even lower, at 3.26%.  Last year at this time the 30-year rate was 4.27%  and the 15-year at 3.72%.

When you combine the low rates with prices that have generally declined throughout the county you have a great opportunity to buy more home for less money.   On a $300,000 mortgage the principal and interest payment at 4.27%  is $1479 per month.  At 3.94%  the monthly payment is $1421 per month.   That is a savings of $58 per month which may not sound like much, but over the length of the mortgage, that is a savings of over $20,880.

So whether you’re looking for your first home, a move-up, or an investment property, now is a great time to buy!  Curious about what’s available?  Give me a call and I’ll be happy to send you some listings of homes and investment opportunities throughout San Diego County.

I’m currently working with a sweet young couple looking to buy their first home here in San Diego.  Yesterday we found one that seems to have most everything they’re looking for, so we sat down to talk about writing an offer.  Prior to showing them homes of course, I made sure they were pre-approved at the price point of our search.

Discussing the offer and reviewing the confidential remarks on the MLS listing sheet, I ran into the words that make my blood boil, “Offer MUST include a pre-approval by Bank of America loan officer Bill Jones.”  This makes me crazy!  Here in San Diego it appears that Bank of America and Chase require a pre-approval by one of their assigned loan officers on all of their REOs.

My buyer looked at me like I was nuts.  “Why do they need another pre-approval when I just went through the whole process at my credit union?”  He is a VA buyer and has a perfectly good pre-approval from Navy Federal Credit Union, so why in the world does he need one from B of A?  I didn’t have a very good answer for him.

I also handle some REO listings and I understand that the banks don’t want to waste time with an unqualified buyer, and that they are trying to build loan business.  But, rather than create obstacles to offers, wouldn’t it make more sense for the listing agent to request an additional pre-approval ONLY if the original one seemed a bit sketchy?  Or, if they really want the business, how about offering an incentive like a free appraisal or point reduction?

When it’s time to write an offer, I want to move quickly – not waste a couple of days chasing down more paperwork!

As we all know, foreclosures are a big part of the current real estate market, and they can offer buyers a great deal….or a disaster.  Here are a few important things to know before sinking your money into a foreclosure.

#1.  The biggest difference between buying a foreclosure and a traditional sale is that the current owner has no knowledge of the property and most likely has never even seen it!  With a traditional sale, the owner is legally bound to disclose anything and everything they know about the property that could impact the functionality or value of the property.  Not so with a foreclosure.

#2.  The second thing to understand is that the property is sold “As Is”.  This could mean anything from the home simply missing a refrigerator or stove to missing all the toilets, floor coverings and windows.   This also includes everything you don’t want, such as any old belongings or outbuildings that were not cleared.

#3.  Now this may sound like, what you see is what you get….but that would be too simple.  You also get what you often can’t see such as termites, bad electrical wiring or a failing roof or rotting pipes.  This is why it is imperative that you spend the money for a general home inspection by a qualified home inspector, and then spend the extra money for additional inspections of any areas that seem to be waving a red flag, such as a roof or plumbing.  Unless otherwise stipulated in the contract, in California you have 17 days after acceptance of your offer to complete your inspections and pull out of the deal with all of your money if you don’t like what you discover.

#4.  I’ve seen this one trip-up would-be buyers too often….make sure that the condition of the property is consistent with what your lender will approve.  For instance, if you are doing an FHA or VA loan, the house has to be habitable; no mold, floor coverings must be in place and appliances and heater must all be in working order.  Talk with your Realtor about the type of loan you are getting and make sure the houses you’re seeing will qualify.

#5.  You will be asked to sign a bank Addendum which basically relieves them of any liability.  A part of the Addendum will cover late closing.  Make sure your loan is in place and ready to close on time.  If there is a late close of escrow and it is the fault of the buyer, it will cost you about $100 a day for each day that you’re late to close escrow.

And finally, make sure you work with a Realtor who is experienced in foreclosures!  There are way too many pitfalls and potential hazards to risk your deal in the hands of an inexperienced agent.

If you have any specific questions, or would like to see foreclosure opportunities in San Diego, please don’t hesitate to give me a call!